cellTVculture

Television is available on multiple screens 24/7

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oldshowbiz:

Three Stooges swarmed by children after their 190 theatrical shorts were sold as a syndicated package to regional television stations around America in 1958. Their new legions of fans were several years younger than those who consumed their shorts in theaters in the previous generation. Here we see a hysterical mob of three year olds ready to tear them to shreds. click to enlarge these incredible photos of a Three Stooges personal appearance at WGN Chicago.

(via broadcastarchive-umd)

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The Resurgence of Romantic Comedies on Television

By the end of October, there will have been seven TV shows about romantic comedies this year. The Mindy Project is back for season three on Fox. Mindy Kaling has long expressed how Nora Ephron has influenced her and her show. Married and You’re the Worst are wrapping up their first season on FX, taking an anti-romantic spin on being married and meet-cutes. ABC has the new programs Selfie, a Pygmalian/My Fair Lady revamp, and Manhattan Love Story, which is mostly about the main couple’s voiceovers. NBC is promoting A to Z, a relationship from beginning to end, and Marry Me, a non-official Happy Endings sequel, not an Arrested Development spin-off. CBS is too busy with football, crime procedurals, and predictable sitcoms to worry about trends.

So, what is it with the romantic comedies? Or is it sitcom rom-coms? No matter. This only means that the workplace romance program is over. Bones, Castle, Grey’s Anatomy, CSI, The Office, and more debuted in the 2000s, and drew in their audiences with a will they/won’t they between the lead characters at their workplace. All of them ended up together. There are procedurals that are debuting later this month featuring a possible workplace romance, but seem almost old-fashioned.

Going further, When Harry Met Sally and Nora Ephron’s films in the early 1990s helped bring a modern take to the silly romantic comedies of the fifties and sixties. Friends came about at the same time, with millions tuning in to watch Ross and Rachel get together, not expecting Monica and Chandler to do so as well.

Before even that, there were two seminal TV shows in the mid 1980s that helped cement the TV romantic comedy: Cheers and Moonlighting. Cheers had Sam and Diane, the local bar owner/former baseball player and the barmaid/perpetual grad student. Moonlighting had David and Maddie, the Motown-loving private investigator and the former model. Although both were set in workplace environments, it was about whether the main couple would ever get together or not. In the season one finale of Cheers and season three finale of Moonlighting, the respective couples finally got together.

Then Diane left Cheers and the Moonlighting Curse started. Cheers would survive Diane leaving the show, becoming more of a hang-out sitcom that lasted eleven seasons. Moonlighting, though, was a train wreck with the behind-the-scenes drama and 1988 Writers’ Strike and was canceled after the fifth season. Critics started to call it the Moonlighting Curse: A show that goes downhill because the lead characters get together. The momentum of the unresolved sexual tension dissipates and the writers do not know what to do with them.

Remember the 1998 film You’ve Got Mail and how it was a romantic comedy for the modern era? Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan fall in love over the internet! Well, think of these new shows as postmodern romantic comedies, rom-coms for the smartphone era.

Filed under tv television romantic comedy cheers moonlighting friends you've got mail rom-com mindy project you're the worst

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dvoart:

                 DVO’s COMIC GIVEAWAY EXTRAVAGANZA!!!!

I wanted to give Bob’s Fans an opportunity to take home some of my artwork and prints that i had done over the years on Bob’s Burgers. Here is your chance!!

                                   RULES OF CONTEST!! 

In order to be automatically entered into this contest, you MUST FOLLOW my blog as well as REBLOG this post. If both of those items aren’t collected when i do the final random drawing for the top three winners, then you will not be entered into the contest. 

Winners will be drawn and announced on SEPT 26TH 2014!!

Once i have picked the three winners, i will contact them via tumblr to finalize the prizes.

GOOD LUCK!!!!
DVO

for more art go to www.dvoart.com

I such a big fan of Bob’s Burgers I want everyone to enter!

Filed under Bob's burgers contest

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Happy Valley on Netflix

TV is starting up again soon, so this is the last weekend to binge mindlessly. The possibilities are infinite, but one smart choice is Happy Valley. It has everything needed in a British mini-series: smart writing, brilliant acting, and scenery porn. The story revolves a kidnapping for ransom, and the police officer that has a past with one of the kidnappers.

First off, it was written by Sally Wainwright, who also created Last Tango in Halifax and Scott & Bailey. All three series feature sharp writing, and great storytelling, and powerful women getting stuff done. No word is superfluous, and every character and setting is well-developed. Guns are rarely used in the series, but there is enough brutal violence. The heroes are flawed and the villains are not purposefully evil. Each character has a reason and a motive for their actions.

All the actors are fabulous. The lead Sarah Lancashire, a veteran of Sally Wainwright, plays the tough-as-nails police sergeant Catherine Carwood raising her 8 year old grandson with her sister, played by Shioban Finneran (recently of Downton Abbey). James Norton is compelling as Tommy Lee Royce, a criminal who is almost sympathetic in how he learns that he has a son.

The setting of West Yorkshire also plays an important role. The rolling green countryside and tight cobblestone streets contrast the working class citizens and criminals that coexist. One of the police cases involves ice cream trucks selling drugs placed at the bottom of ice cream cones.

Adding some poignancy is the real Yorkshire police problems. Recently some of their officials have stepped down from lack of action in over a thousand of child abuse cases. When Carwood’s daughter commits suicide due to her pregnancy from rape, her husband divorces her and her son stops talking to her. The show’s title Happy Valley comes from a nickname for a local area’s drug problem. The kidnapper/Catherine’s daughter’s rapist was a drug dealer, and Catherine’s sister is a recovering heroin addict. Though the crimes are of a different nature, it illuminates a problem with the police. The criminal element is known, but most crimes are ignored by the police, and do little to stop it. That is starting to change, but even in the series, the police in charge hesitate to listen to Carwood when she warns about Tommy Lee Royce.

As the title theme song plays out, “Stuck in this speed bump city where the only thing that’s pretty is the thought of getting out.” Happy Valley is enthralling to watch, but a world happy to visit for only six episodes.

Filed under happy valley sally wainwright sarah lancashire netflix

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The Death of Adulthood in American Culture

Their deaths were (and will be) a culmination and a conclusion: Tony, Walter and Don are the last of the patriarchs…Meanwhile, television has made it very clear that we are at a frontier. Not only have shows like “The Sopranos” and “Mad Men” heralded the end of male authority; we’ve also witnessed the erosion of traditional adulthood in any form, at least as it used to be portrayed in the formerly tried-and-true genres of the urban cop show, the living-room or workplace sitcom and the prime-time soap opera. Instead, we are now in the age of “Girls,” “Broad City,” “Masters of Sex” (a prehistory of the end of patriarchy), “Bob’s Burgers” (a loopy post-“Simpsons” family cartoon) and a flood of goofy, sweet, self-indulgent and obnoxious improv-based web videos. What all of these shows grasp at, in one way or another, is that nobody knows how to be a grown-up anymore. Adulthood as we have known it has become conceptually untenable.

Filed under a. o. scott ny times adulthood The Sopranos Breaking Bad Mad Men

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Why Picking Up ‘Longmire’ Would Be The Smartest Financial Decision Netflix Ever Made

I’m exaggerating, but senior citizens are a huge untapped market for streaming services, and the only people who watch more TV than old people is very young people. Netflix is already creating original animated fare to ensure that parents keep using Netflix subscriptions to babysit their kids (GUILTY), and think of all the new subscriptions they could get if they started tapping into the seniors’ market, starting with a show like Longmire.

I’m not kidding, either. Think about it. Don and Karen Oldster already have a laptop, which they use to keep up with their genealogy and Skype their grandkids (grandparents are surprisingly tech savvy when it comes to talking to their grandchildren). When they figure out that A&E has cancelled Longmirein a few months when their adult children tell them, they’re going to be bummed. So, those adult kids tell their grandparents about Netflix, and say, “Well, you could watch the entire season in a day or two on Netflix.”

After their eyeballs fall out of their damn heads with excitement, Don and Karen Oldster will decide to subscribe to Netflix, but just for one month, so they can watch Longmire. But then when they’re done with Longmire, they start snooping around and discover that there’s about 40,000 hours of television on Netflix they haven’t watched. So, they kill their cable subscriptions ($100 a month) and trade it in for a Netflix subscription ($10 a month); they gorge themselves on amazing television programs, and they use that extra $90 a month to buy the good Metamucil. Suddenly, those grandparents are also a lot more interesting to talk to because all they want to do is talk Buffy and The League with you.

In the meantime, Netflix has just added 5 million new viewers, who are going to tell all their friends about it, and because the median age of death keeps rising, Netflix has these old people on the hook for subscriptions for at least the next two decades, or even more because old people suddenly have a better reason to live than to Skype their grandkids and play golf. NOW THEY HAVE UNLIMITED TELEVISION.

Filed under uproxx Longmire netflix

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Composer Brian Reitzell Explains His Psychotic Music for NBC’s Hannibal

Where do you picture someone who buys the album listening to it? Just because you’re not watching the show doesn’t mean it’s not incredibly intense.
Oh, man, on the couch. I think it’s really good to just kinda turn the lights down — I mean, in the dark it’s the best, because it’ll really come at you. You shouldn’t listen to it while driving, though I had to, to assemble all of it. The way the soundtrack was made is mini suites, so I went through about 25 hours of score to condense it into four CDs. Or in the case of the vinyl, I think it’s five double records or something, it’s ridiculous.The physical copies are just beautiful. It’s very classy, I’m really proud of it.

Filed under nbc hannibal brian reitzell vulture

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Can Thursday Night Save Network TV?
Yet even though fewer of us are watching on Thursdays, the night remains critical to broadcasters for a basic reason: It’s where the money is. Or, more precisely, where certain kinds of ad revenue can be found. Because most feature films open on Fridays, movie studios will still drop a lot of money for ads that air just before people make their weekend plans. And retailers, including automakers, also look to Thursday programs to prime shoppers for weekend deals. This, in addition to its massive ratings, is why CBS’s The Big Bang Theory, which airs on Thursdays, charged more for a 30-second spot — about $317,000 — than any other scripted show on TV last season. And why, of the 20 costliest shows on which to buy ad time last season, seven aired on Thursdays, according to Ad Age. For all the talk about time-­shifting in TV these days, timing still matters — and no one is more invested than the networks in making sure that remains the case. ”Since I’ve been at CBS, since I’ve been watching television — it’s been a dominant night,” says CBS Entertainment chairman Nina Tassler.

Can Thursday Night Save Network TV?

Yet even though fewer of us are watching on Thursdays, the night remains critical to broadcasters for a basic reason: It’s where the money is. Or, more precisely, where certain kinds of ad revenue can be found. Because most feature films open on Fridays, movie studios will still drop a lot of money for ads that air just before people make their weekend plans. And retailers, including automakers, also look to Thursday programs to prime shoppers for weekend deals. This, in addition to its massive ratings, is why CBS’s The Big Bang Theory, which airs on Thursdays, charged more for a 30-second spot — about $317,000 — than any other scripted show on TV last season. And why, of the 20 costliest shows on which to buy ad time last season, seven aired on Thursdays, according to Ad Age. For all the talk about time-­shifting in TV these days, timing still matters — and no one is more invested than the networks in making sure that remains the case. ”Since I’ve been at CBS, since I’ve been watching television — it’s been a dominant night,” says CBS Entertainment chairman Nina Tassler.

Filed under tv television josef adalian vulture NY Mag thursday cbs nbc abc fox